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More than 400 women are currently seeking compensation against Health Boards in Scotland for problems they have experienced following insertion of transvaginal mesh implants.

Surgical mesh is a woven sheet used as a permanent or temporary support for organs and other tissues during a variety of surgeries. It is created from inorganic and biological materials and can be used for reconstructive work, such as pelvic organ prolapse.

Pelvic organ prolapse is the bulging of one or more of the pelvic organs (uterus, bowel or bladder) into the vagina. Symptoms can include:

  • a sensation of a bulge or something coming down or out of the vagina, which sometimes needs to be pushed back
  • discomfort during sex
  • a problem passing urine, such as slow stream, a feeling of not emptying the bladder fully, needing to urinate more often and leaking a small amount of urine when you cough, sneeze or exercise.

Prolapse can occur after childbirth, particularly if you have had a long or difficult labour, had multiple babies or given birth to a larger baby. Just under half of all women who have had children are affected by prolapse of some degree, and it can be fixed with surgery using transvaginal mesh.

Over the last 20 years, more than 20,000 women in Scotland have had surgery to insert transvaginal mesh implants. However, some of those women have experienced complications following surgery and concerns regarding the safety of the mesh devices were raised by the women involved.

The former Cabinet Secretary for Health & Wellbeing, Alex Neil MSP, first met with a group of women adversely affected by the use of mesh in May 2013. Following this meeting, the Cabinet Secretary asked that a Working Group be set up to address the issues affecting women who have undergone trasvaginal mesh surgery.

The Transvaginal Meshes Working Group (TMWG) was created to develop a clearer understanding of the issues affecting women who had suffered complications from mesh surgery. A review of the remit of this working group led to greater clinical representation to evaluate current clinical practice and make recommendations for change. The Expert Group was formed in December 2013 as a development of the TMWG.

Dr Agur was the expert who led the group responsible for reviewing the safety fears related to using vaginal mesh implants in Scotland and he has recently spoken out to explain why he resigned.

He stepped down from the Group due to an entire chapter of the report being removed and he believes that surgery to insert mesh implants should not be carried out as a matter of course, and only in extreme circumstances due to the risk of acute and irreversible damage. The use of mesh implant surgery is currently still common practice until any guidelines contained in the review can be implemented.  

If you have been affected by any issues regarding implants, our specialist team can provide support and advice and can also provide guidance on class action claims. 

Pelvic organ prolapse is the bulging of one or more of the pelvic organs (uterus, bowel or bladder) into the vagina. Symptoms can include:

  • a sensation of a bulge or something coming down or out of the vagina, which sometimes needs to be pushed back
  • discomfort during sex
  • a problem passing urine, such as slow stream, a feeling of not emptying the bladder fully, needing to urinate more often and leaking a small amount of urine when you cough, sneeze or exercise.

Prolapse can occur after childbirth, particularly if you have had a long or difficult labour, had multiple babies or given birth to a larger baby. Just under half of all women who have had children are affected by prolapse of some degree, and it can be fixed with surgery using transvaginal mesh.

Over the last 20 years, more than 20,000 women in Scotland have had surgery to insert transvaginal mesh implants. However, some of those women have experienced complications following surgery and concerns regarding the safety of the mesh devices were raised by the women involved.

The former Cabinet Secretary for Health & Wellbeing, Alex Neil MSP, first met with a group of women adversely affected by the use of mesh in May 2013. Following this meeting, the Cabinet Secretary asked that a Working Group be set up to address the issues affecting women who have undergone trasvaginal mesh surgery.

The Transvaginal Meshes Working Group (TMWG) was created to develop a clearer understanding of the issues affecting women who had suffered complications from mesh surgery. A review of the remit of this working group led to greater clinical representation to evaluate current clinical practice and make recommendations for change. The Expert Group was formed in December 2013 as a development of the TMWG.

Dr Agur was the expert who led the group responsible for reviewing the safety fears related to using vaginal mesh implants in Scotland and he has recently spoken out to explain why he resigned.

He stepped down from the Group due to an entire chapter of the report being removed and he believes that surgery to insert mesh implants should not be carried out as a matter of course, and only in extreme circumstances due to the risk of acute and irreversible damage. The use of mesh implant surgery is currently still common practice until any guidelines contained in the review can be implemented.  

If you have been affected by any issues regarding implants, our specialist team can provide support and advice and can also provide guidance on class action claims. 

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